Sunday, March 10, 2019

Popular Hindi Cinema and the Film Song

Popular Hindi Cinema and the Film Song. Raj Kapoor in Shree 420 Movie   Today I will write about Indian Traditional cinema and the relationship of songs with Indian cinema. In Hollywood or British Cinema or French, Italian, German cinema there is no use or a little use of songs in the cinema. But song is a cultural part of Indian subcontinent. Besides, there is importance of music or songs in Hindu religion though it's religious music or song. In fact songs are also a cultural and religious part of in Indian cinema along with Bangladeshi and Pakistani cinema. But I want to express only about traditional or classical Indian Hindi cinema and the popular song. In Indian cinema, popular sings have been used extremely as a cultural and religious tradition. In the former Indian or traditional cinema, many male and female singers have also cast for the popular songs. Actually Hindi language movies produced in Bombay (now Mumbai) commonly known as 'Bollywood Cinema'. Popular songs mostly have been used in Bollywood cinema. The evergreen song 'Mera Joota Hai Japani' (My Shoes are Japanese' has been used. Besides, Song has been used in Mira Mair's Mississippi Masala (1992). Besides, popular song ' Phir Bhi Dil Hai Hindustani' (But the heart is still Indian) is used in a film in which Shahrukh Khan has cast. But the song already being cited by Hindi Films as early as Chori Chori (Sneaky Sneak, 1956) a loose remake of Frank Capra's It happened One Night (1934) and the last film featuring the legendary 1950s screen couple Raj Kapoor and Nargis as a romantic duo. The song is briefly heard playing on the popular Radio Ceylon (at a time when All India Radio didn't play film songs). Awara Hoon (I am a Vagabond) is the title song of the film Awara (1951). It is a very popular song. At that time it was being played a lot. The first Indian sound film 'Alam Ara' (The light of the world, 1931) included seven songs established Indian cinema as a musical form. In 1930s, the singing star K.L Saigal became legendary for his performances in films such as Devdas (1935) and Street Singer (1938). In the next decades, female singers Suraiya and 'Melody Queen' Noorjehan, who appeared on screen in Anmol Ghadi (Precious Time, 1946) and dominated popular music. Popular male playback singers such as Mohammad Rafi, Mukhesh, Manna Dey, Talat Mahmud and Kishore Kumar (the rare playback singer who also starred in films) have contributed in the traditional Indian cinemas.
Raj Kapoor in Shree 420 Movie

Today I will write about Indian Traditional cinema and the relationship of songs with Indian cinema. In Hollywood or British Cinema or French, Italian, German cinema there is no use or a little use of songs in the cinema. But song is a cultural part of Indian subcontinent. Besides, there is importance of music or songs in Hindu religion though it's religious music or song. In fact songs are also a cultural and religious part of in Indian cinema along with Bangladeshi and Pakistani cinema. But I want to express only about traditional or classical Indian Hindi cinema and the popular song. In Indian cinema, popular sings have been used extremely as a cultural and religious tradition. In the former Indian or traditional cinema, many male and female singers have also cast for the popular songs. Actually Hindi language movies produced in Bombay (now Mumbai) commonly known as 'Bollywood Cinema'. Popular songs mostly have been used in Bollywood cinema. The evergreen song 'Mera Joota Hai Japani' (My Shoes are Japanese' has been used. Besides, Song has been used in Mira Mair's Mississippi Masala (1992). Besides, popular song ' Phir Bhi Dil Hai Hindustani' (But the heart is still Indian) is used in a film in which Shahrukh Khan has cast. But the song already being cited by Hindi Films as early as Chori Chori (Sneaky Sneak, 1956) a loose remake of Frank Capra's It happened One Night (1934) and the last film featuring the legendary 1950s screen couple Raj Kapoor and Nargis as a romantic duo. The song is briefly heard playing on the popular Radio Ceylon (at a time when All India Radio didn't play film songs). Awara Hoon (I am a Vagabond) is the title song of the film Awara (1951). It is a very popular song. At that time it was being played a lot. The first Indian sound film 'Alam Ara' (The light of the world, 1931) included seven songs established Indian cinema as a musical form. In 1930s, the singing star K.L Saigal became legendary for his performances in films such as Devdas (1935) and Street Singer (1938). In the next decades, female singers Suraiya and 'Melody Queen' Noorjehan, who appeared on screen in Anmol Ghadi (Precious Time, 1946) and dominated popular music. Popular male playback singers such as Mohammad Rafi, Mukhesh, Manna Dey, Talat Mahmud and Kishore Kumar (the rare playback singer who also starred in films) have contributed in the traditional Indian cinemas.


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