Monday, October 8, 2018

Room at the Top (1959) : Movie Review

Room at the Top is a British film directed by Jack Clayton in 1959. The film is based on the novel of the same name by John Braine. The film was screenplayed by Neil Paterson and with with uncredited work of Mordecai Picher. The film was produced by John Woolf and James Woolf. It was starred by Laurence Harvey, Simone Signoret, Heather Sears, Donald Wolfit, Donald Houston and Hermione Baddeley.    Plot:   Joe Lampton an ambitious and young man who has moved from the dreary factory of Dufton to Warnley to assure a secure but poorly paid, post in the Borough Treasurer's Department in late 1940s in West Ridding of Yorkshire, England. He is determined to succeed and ignoring the warnings of a colleague, he pressure Susan Brown, daughter of the local Industrial Magnate, Mr. Brown. On the other hand, Joe and Alice Aisgill have an affair. Alice Aisgill is an unhappily married older woman. Joe continues his pursuit of Susan upon her return. Once he has sex with her. He loses interest but he admits that he truly loves Alice. The two of them decide that she should ask for a divorce from her brutal husband George Aisgill. But George Aisgill refuses and declares that he will ruin them by socially and financially if the continue their relationship. Susan's father delivers the news that Susan is pregnant. He expects Joe immediately to stop seeing Alice and marry Susan and come to work for him as an executive. But after hearing the news that Joe marries Susan, Alice gets drunk and crashes her car. She dies over the ensuring hours. But Joe blames himself for hr fate. He is beaten unconscious by a gang. But Joe ir recovered by Soames in the time to marry Susan. At last, Joe has accomplished all of the goals that he had hoped.    Story:   The story of the film is taken from a novel of the same name written by John Braine. The film is screenplayed by Neil Paterson and with uncrdited work of Mordecai Picher.    Cinematography:   The cinematographer of the film was Freddie Francis. The cinematography of the film is very important here to know about it largely. Before telling about cinematography , we need to describe about the use of shots, style , Mise-en scene and the use of light.    Shots:   In this film various kinds of shots and angles are used effectively. Camera movement is also one of the main characteristics of cinematography. In this film, trolly shot, tracking shots are used nicely. Wide angle shots, mid shots, close-up shots and top angle shots low angle shots, high angle shots eye angle shots and different kinds of shots are used in this film skillfully.    Mise-en-scene:   The arrangement of the scenery and the props in a artistic way is called Mise-en-scene. There are huge amount of props are used in this film to look it beautiful  and natural. Character's movement, camera movement, use of huge amount of props make the scenery beautiful. In this film, there are  both indoor and outdoor shooting. So, some more props have been used in indoor shooting.    Light:   In this film, most of the time artificial light is used in indoor shooting but natural light is used in outdoor shooting. But the light is used perfectly in this film. Light has created shape of the objects and characters.    Acting:   Acting of the characters in the film is natural based in a word. Actually, the good performers like Laurence Harveyas, Simone Signoret, Hermione Baddely have played their roles perfectly. They are the professional casts.    Sound and Music:   The music of the film is composed by Mario Nascimbene. Actually he is a good composer at that time. The background music is used accordingly to the scenery or sequences.    Editing:   The film is edited by Rulph Kemplen. His editing style is just perfect one. Video and audio mixing in this film is very skillful and important. Adjustment, mixing of different kinds of shots that make the film meaningful. Assembling of these kinds of scenes and shots is also a good and perfect work. Editing style is also perfect.
Room at the Top (1959) 

Room at the Top is a British film directed by Jack Clayton in 1959. The film is based on the novel of the same name by John Braine. The film was screenplayed by Neil Paterson and with with uncredited work of Mordecai Picher. The film was produced by John Woolf and James Woolf. It was starred by Laurence Harvey, Simone Signoret, Heather Sears, Donald Wolfit, Donald Houston and Hermione Baddeley.

Plot: 
Joe Lampton an ambitious and young man who has moved from the dreary factory of Dufton to Warnley to assure a secure but poorly paid, post in the Borough Treasurer's Department in late 1940s in West Ridding of Yorkshire, England. He is determined to succeed and ignoring the warnings of a colleague, he pressure Susan Brown, daughter of the local Industrial Magnate, Mr. Brown. On the other hand, Joe and Alice Aisgill have an affair. Alice Aisgill is an unhappily married older woman. Joe continues his pursuit of Susan upon her return. Once he has sex with her. He loses interest but he admits that he truly loves Alice. The two of them decide that she should ask for a divorce from her brutal husband George Aisgill. But George Aisgill refuses and declares that he will ruin them by socially and financially if the continue their relationship. Susan's father delivers the news that Susan is pregnant. He expects Joe immediately to stop seeing Alice and marry Susan and come to work for him as an executive. But after hearing the news that Joe marries Susan, Alice gets drunk and crashes her car. She dies over the ensuring hours. But Joe blames himself for hr fate. He is beaten unconscious by a gang. But Joe ir recovered by Soames in the time to marry Susan. At last, Joe has accomplished all of the goals that he had hoped.

Story: 
The story of the film is taken from a novel of the same name written by John Braine. The film is screenplayed by Neil Paterson and with uncrdited work of Mordecai Picher.

Cinematography: 
The cinematographer of the film was Freddie Francis. The cinematography of the film is very important here to know about it largely. Before telling about cinematography , we need to describe about the use of shots, style , Mise-en scene and the use of light.

Shots: 
In this film various kinds of shots and angles are used effectively. Camera movement is also one of the main characteristics of cinematography. In this film, trolly shot, tracking shots are used nicely. Wide angle shots, mid shots, close-up shots and top angle shots low angle shots, high angle shots eye angle shots and different kinds of shots are used in this film skillfully.

Mise-en-scene:
 The arrangement of the scenery and the props in a artistic way is called Mise-en-scene. There are huge amount of props are used in this film to look it beautiful  and natural. Character's movement, camera movement, use of huge amount of props make the scenery beautiful. In this film, there are  both indoor and outdoor shooting. So, some more props have been used in indoor shooting.

Light: 
In this film, most of the time artificial light is used in indoor shooting but natural light is used in outdoor shooting. But the light is used perfectly in this film. Light has created shape of the objects and characters.

Acting: 
Acting of the characters in the film is natural based in a word. Actually, the good performers like Laurence Harveyas, Simone Signoret, Hermione Baddely have played their roles perfectly. They are the professional casts.

Sound and Music: 
The music of the film is composed by Mario Nascimbene. Actually he is a good composer at that time. The background music is used accordingly to the scenery or sequences.

Editing: 
The film is edited by Rulph Kemplen. His editing style is just perfect one. Video and audio mixing in this film is very skillful and important. Adjustment, mixing of different kinds of shots that make the film meaningful. Assembling of these kinds of scenes and shots is also a good and perfect work. Editing style is also perfect.

Watch the full movie 'Room at the Top' (1959) 1st Part here....

Room at the Top 1959 p1


Watch the full movie 'Room at the Top' (1959) 2nd Part here....


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